Do Different Age Groups Prefer Different Content Online? [Infographic]

There have been many reports on the different media consumption habits of each generation, and how you need to take that into account when planning on how you’re going to reach your audience, but there’s fewer on how, exactly, each generation is different.

One of the most difficult elements of this is that the Milennial generation, the one that every brand’s so keen to reach, is huge. Millennials (those born between 1981 and 2004) are now the largest generation in America, covering a wide spectrum of varying people – too wide, by most accounts, to actually be used as a demographic divider.

In practical terms, it makes more sense to separate this group into Gen Y (1981-1999) and Gen Z (After 2000), which is more likely to be indicative of habitual behavior – which is what Hand Made Writings have done with this new infographic, examining the key content habits and behaviors of the different generations online, based on various research reports and studies.

And while there are still some wide generalizations implied by the data – and the only true way to know your audience habits and preferences is to study your own audience analytics – the insights presented do provide some important considerations worthy of factoring into your plans and testing.

generational content info

Over 93% of Celebrity Influencers are Violating FTC Guidelines [Infographic]

As influencers and celebrities post, filter, and hashtag their way to fame and fortune, brands are working with them to reach and communicate with consumers. Influencer marketing on Instagram alone is now a massive $1 billion industry.

In April 2017, the FTC sent notices to over 90 celebrities, brands, and influencers reminding them of the regulations. Celebrities and influencers on Instagram have been known to neglect proper disclosures on paid posts, and we wanted to know the extent of the problem. Over the course of one month, we assessed the top 50 celebrities on Instagram to find that just 7% may be in compliance with the FTC’s guidelines and regulations.

Like the rest of the advertising industry, celebrity social media endorsements and influencer marketing are monitored by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the government agency charged with consumer protection against unfair or deceptive business practices. Previously, the FTC had filed several notable complaints against large companies like Lord & Taylor for failure to require disclosures on sponsored content on social media.

See the full breakdown of the state of FTC compliance among Instagram’s top 50 celebrities below.

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Study: Influencer Marketing Is 11 Times More Effective Than Banner Ads

adweek_brandshare_miguel_camachoWe all know influencers can have an impact on product marketing, but are we really getting a clear, measurable picture of how they actually sway sales in the store aisles?

That was the challenge behind a first-of-its-kind sales effect study focusing entirely on influencer and content marketing released today by TapInfluence, Nielsen Catalina Solutions and WhiteWave Foods, the parent company of brands like Silk, Horizon and Earthbound Farms.

“We’ve been running influencer marketing campaigns for six years and have found it to be one of the most effective ways to reach consumers,” said Lori Ulanoff, digital center of excellence manager for WhiteWave. “This study proved that our influencer marketing impacted sales.”

“Research groups have released ROI studies on influencer marketing in the past, but they mostly relied on metrics such as views or engagement,” says Rustin Banks, TapInfluence’s chief product officer. “This is the first study to tie in-store sales lift to influencer marketing. The $285 incremental sales per 1000 impressions from influencer marketing combined with a continually decreasing CPM, resulted in 11 times the ROI over average display ads annually.”

Read full article here.