Starbucks’s mobile payments system is so popular in the U.S., it has more users than Apple’s or Google’s

Screen Shot 2018-05-23 at 5.51.38 AMBy the end of this year, a quarter of U.S. smartphone users — 55 million people — over the age of 14 will make an in-store mobile payment. More than 40 percent of those people will have done so through Starbucks’s mobile payments app, according to new data from research firm eMarketer.

The Starbucks app, which launched before the other three top payments apps — Apple Pay, Google Pay and Samsung Pay — has long been the most successful payments app. It’s likely going to maintain that lead over the next few years.

The Starbucks app lets users pay with their phones and earn credits toward future purchases. That usage is significant: Starbucks said its mobile order-and-pay system accounted for 12 percent of all U.S. transactions in the quarter ended April 1.

By year’s end, Starbucks will have 23.4 million users in the U.S. who have made an in-store mobile payment in the previous six months, according to eMarketer’s estimates. That number is higher than the 14.9 million customers who are part of Starbucks’s rewards program, which only counts monthly active users; customers also don’t have to be rewards members to make purchases using the app.

Read full article here. 

 

6 Digital Stats of the Week That Grabbed Our Attention

digital-stats-blue-content-2017-840x460Along with the holiday season’s cookies and gifts, the past week has also been packed with digital marketing stats.

Here are six data-based stories that stood out to us.

1. Live views

Sorry, Dick Clark, but smartphones have taken over how people celebrate New Year’s Eve and they aren’t necessarily watching the ball drop in New York’s Times Square.

According to Facebook, more than 10 million people used Facebook Live on New Year’s Eve, up 47 percent from 2016. In terms of top cities, people in Las Vegas and Orlando, Fla., apparently were the biggest streamers.

While not apples to apples, consider that Facebook delivered ten times the number of viewers as CNN. The network’s New Year’s Eve special with Anderson Cooper and Andy Cohen raked in 1.7 million total viewers in prime time.

Click here to read more about Facebook’s findings.

SEE THE REST OF THE LIST HERE. 

Facebook’s Published a New Study Which Highlights Effective Mobile Video Techniques

Facebook has published a new study which examines the effectiveness of traditional video approaches – i.e. TV ads – when looking to reach modern, mobile consumers.

Working with Metrixlab, Facebook commissioned a study of some 759 video ads from 300+ brands, across nine verticals, and distributed across 25 countries. The researchers surveyed video viewers to get their responses on brand recall, then collated them relative to each approach.

The core of their findings was this:

“We discovered that ads created for mobile first stand out on Facebook and Instagram, and perform better across a range of different metrics.”

The first area they looked at was brand recall, separating the video approaches into three distinct categories.

5 Reasons Why Your Business Needs to Start Making Vertical Video for Social Media

Does your business record vertical videos for social media?

In years gone by, recording and uploading video with the camera held vertically was looked upon with ridicule, producing big black bars either side of the picture and a narrow viewing angle, guaranteed to turn viewers off.

But times are changing. 

In this post, I’m going to lay out five reasons why your business should be experimenting with vertical video for social media marketing in 2017, and the potential benefits it can bring.

1. People naturally hold their phones vertically 

Obvious, but important.

vertical-vs-horiztonal.png

If we strip smartphones back to their most basic function – giving users the ability to make and receive phone calls – the design of modern smarphones simply follows the tradition of “dumb” phones from decades past; that the device should be held vertically so that the user can speak and listen with minimal fuss. TV and cinema, meanwhile – the dominant visual media for so long – have demanded that the picture is viewed horizontally for the best experience. And so, despite all the things smartphones can now do, we’re historically conditioned to hold phones vertically and view video horizontally.

We’ve been stuck between two competing worlds, but times are changing.

For some hard facts, look to the MOVR Mobile Overview Report from December 2014, which found, unsuprisingly, that smartphone users hold their phones vertically about 94% of the time.

Read the rest of the article here. 

Google’s first phone is first-rate

20161017-google-pixel-explodedAt long last — almost eight years to the day from when the first Android phone went on sale — Google is launching a smartphone for which it designed the hardware, software and cloud ecosystem: The Pixel. No longer will the tech giant be entirely dependent on other companies to present Android in its best light, or on hardware that varied wildly but was never built from the ground up to be the best physical instantiation of pure Google Android.

See the full review from ReCode Here.