How to Legally Use Music in Social Media Campaigns (and Why You Should)

music-choices-resizedMusic in advertising has evolved from the jingles of old to the modern sounds of today, as shown by the addition of popular songs by the likes of Beyonce, Icona Pop or Taylor Swift. Studies have consistently demonstrated that the addition of music can take a ho-hum ad spot from dull to unforgettable, such is the power of music.

The role of music in advertising is rarely studied on its own, and statistics as to the prevalence of an ad’s accompanying melodies are few and far between. A 1989 study by Musical Quarterly revealed that approximately three-quarters of ads include music in some way, a ratio that appears relatively stable over the years.

The use of music in advertising is unquestionable – but, do differences in video ad performance exist between the use of royalty-free music and rights managed music? Does one element lead to (or take away) the stickiness that every brand is looking for when they run an ad?

In this post, we’ll discuss all things musical – from the meaning of copyrights to the use of royalty free pieces. Final consideration will be given to the discussion of the differences, if any, between the available types of music licenses. Does one perform better than the other? Let’s see: Read the full article here. 

Spotify tripled its losses in two years. Is streaming audio in trouble?

spotify-genericThe financial data, revealed in a public document in Luxembourg and reviewed by the New York Times, comes as the company is reportedly preparing to enter the streaming video market. That move could entice more advertising money, which would help alleviate the losses. Spotify blamed the losses on costs associated with product development, expansion and licensing, the Times reported.

Spotify has long claimed that it would be able to achieve profitability once it hits a certain number of paying customers. The fact that its losses seem to grow as it brings in more money seems counter to that notion. It now has 60 million total users, 15 million of which paid for the service. Read full article here.