How to Legally Use Music in Social Media Campaigns (and Why You Should)

music-choices-resizedMusic in advertising has evolved from the jingles of old to the modern sounds of today, as shown by the addition of popular songs by the likes of Beyonce, Icona Pop or Taylor Swift. Studies have consistently demonstrated that the addition of music can take a ho-hum ad spot from dull to unforgettable, such is the power of music.

The role of music in advertising is rarely studied on its own, and statistics as to the prevalence of an ad’s accompanying melodies are few and far between. A 1989 study by Musical Quarterly revealed that approximately three-quarters of ads include music in some way, a ratio that appears relatively stable over the years.

The use of music in advertising is unquestionable – but, do differences in video ad performance exist between the use of royalty-free music and rights managed music? Does one element lead to (or take away) the stickiness that every brand is looking for when they run an ad?

In this post, we’ll discuss all things musical – from the meaning of copyrights to the use of royalty free pieces. Final consideration will be given to the discussion of the differences, if any, between the available types of music licenses. Does one perform better than the other? Let’s see: Read the full article here. 

Infographic: 72% of Spotify Listeners Are Millennials. Here’s How They Use the Service

Music streaming services are more popular than ever, and, naturally, no group is leading the charge more than millennials. One of the most popular of those services is Spotify, which provided Adweek with exclusive data to get a better look at this demo. “As the largest global streaming service, we have a deep understanding of millennials from our data on streaming habits,” said Spotify business marketing global director Jeff Rossi. “For marketers looking to reach this highly sought-after group, we understand that millennials are listening more frequently and streaming in more places than nonmillennials, including most often on mobile and desktop as they move from home to school to work. We also see that millennials’ streaming habits are not as impacted by traditional peak consumption periods like prime time or drive time. They are connected all day from the moment they wake up.” pitch-perfect-data-02.png

Google launches YouTube Music, a new app for discovering music videos

YT-music-640x529YouTube’s standalone music streaming app has arrived.

Google launched YouTube Music Thursday, the music complement to its new video subscription service YouTube Red. The app is available now for iOS and Android.

YouTube Music is all about discovery. If you search for an artist, track or album, the app will surface everything from official music videos to popular covers and remixes to concert videos.

And, like any good music app, you can create playlists, listen to personalized “stations,” and get recommendations in the app’s home tab. YouTube Music is free but paying for a $9.99/month YouTube Red subscription buys you quite a few extra features, like offline listening, the ability to switch between video and audio-only streams and the option to listen to tracks and videos in the background while in other apps. It also gets rid of the ads free users will hear when using the app.

Google is likely hoping YouTube Music will help drive people toward its new YouTube Red subscription service, which launched last month. A YouTube Red subscription also comes with on-demand access to Google Play Music — that’s Google’s other music streaming service — and those who already subscribe to Play Music will be able to use YouTube Music’s premium features.

It’s unclear whether a new service built around music videos, which most people are already used to getting for free, will help YouTube Red gain traction but the app should be a welcome addition to YouTube’s many music-loving users. To help promote the new service, the company is giving new users access to the premium features for free for the first 14 days.