Everything you need to know about Apple’s new credit card

uploadscardimage9583477473f7f1-abb9-409b-99f4-15c278e103c1.pngfit-in__1200x9600Apple wants a permanent place in your wallet, and beginning this summer, you’ll be able to give it one.

The company announced Monday that it’s launching Apple Card, a new credit card made for the iPhone. The card, which is both a digital card in the Wallet app and a physical MasterCard, is meant to be easier to use and understand than most conventional credit cards, according to Apple. And it boasts some intriguing benefits, like no fees and a daily rewards program.

But, as with any new credit card, it’s important to read the fine print in order to understand if Apple Card makes the most sense for you.

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Netflix may be losing $192M per month from piracy, cord cutting study claims

netflix-app-icon-iosAs many as 1 in 5 people today are mooching off of someone else’s account when streaming video from Netflix,  Hulu  or Amazon Video, according to a new study from CordCutting.com. Of these, Netflix tends to be pirated for the longest period — 26 months, compared with 16 months for Amazon Prime Video or 11 months for Hulu. That could be because Netflix freeloaders often mooch off their family instead of a friend — 48 percent use their parents’ login, while another 14 percent use their sister or brother’s credentials, the firm found.

At a base price of $7.99 per month (the study was performed before Netflix’s January 2019 price increase), freeloading users could save $207.74 over a 26-month period. At scale, these losses can add up, the study claims.

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Facebook Releases New Report on Evolving Sports Engagement on Social Platforms

Sports has always been a key element of our interactive process, a means to connect and engage over a common interest and participate in related events. Given this, it’s no surprise to see that sport also plays a significant role in how people engage on social platforms, and that can be a valuable consideration for brands looking for ways to increase brand awareness and connection with their fans.

In line with this, and in the lead-up to the 2019 Super Bowl, Facebook has published a new report which looks at how social media has changed the way people engage with sports content, and what brands need to consider in this shift. Facebook utilized the GlobalWebIndex “Sports Around the World” study, which surveyed over 90,000 internet users, in order to extract relevant insights about how digital consumers engage with sports.

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Google reportedly bought Mastercard data to link online ads with offline purchases

mdoying_180117_2249_0206stills.0If you’re a Mastercard holder in the US, Google has reportedly been tracking whether your buying habits are influenced by online ads in your offline purchases for the past year. The secret deal between the two companies was brokered after four years of negotiation, according to a Bloomberg report published today.

Neither Google nor Mastercard have publicly announced the partnership, and neither company let its customers know that their offline purchases made in stores are being tracked through Mastercard purchase histories and correlated with online ad interactions. Both Google and Mastercard say that the data is anonymized in order to protect personally identifiable information.

Google reportedly paid Mastercard millions of dollars for data on what people have been buying. It used that data to build a tool for advertisers that would break down whether people who had clicked online ads later went on to purchase a product at a physical retail store.

Bloomberg reported in detail how the process works. It starts with a customer who’s logged into a Google account on the web clicking a Google ad. That person browses a certain item, but doesn’t purchase it. Later on, if they use their MasterCard to buy that item in a physical store within 30 days, Google will send the advertiser a report about that product and the effectiveness of its ads, with a section for “offline revenue” listing the retail sales.

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Cashierless Tech Is Coming. Here’s How It Will Blow Up Retail

trigo-vision-cashierless-PAGE-2018The debut of Amazon’s checkout-less convenience store Amazon Go is one of the biggest evolutions in transactional commerce since Ohio saloonkeeper James Ritty patented the cash register in 1879. That’s because Amazon’s so-called “just walk out” technology uses computer vision, sensor fusion and deep learning that allows shoppers to enter with an app, grab items off the shelves and leave without waiting in line to pay a cashier manning Ritty’s 140-year-old invention.

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Airbnb for Work now accounts for 15 percent of bookings

Screen Shot 2018-08-06 at 9.17.26 AM.pngBusiness travelers have become an increasingly important part of the Airbnb business, according to a new blog post. The company says that Airbnb for Work, which launched in 2014, has seen bookings triple from 2015 to 2016, and triple again from 2016 to 2017. In fact, Airbnb  says that almost 700,000 companies have signed up for and booked with Airbnb for Work.

Interestingly, the breakdown of companies working with Airbnb for traveler lodging are pretty diverse — employees from large enterprise companies (5,000+ employees) and employees from startups and SMBs (one to 250 employees) take a 40-40 split, with the final 20 percent of Airbnb for Work bookings going to mid-sized companies.

In July of 2017, Airbnb started making its listings available via SAP Concur, a tool used by a large number of business travelers. Airbnb says that this integration has been a huge help to growing Airbnb for Work, with Concur seeing a 42 percent increase in employees expensing Airbnb stays from 2016 to 2017. Moreover, 63 percent of Concur’s Fortune 500 clients have booked a business trip on Airbnb.

One interesting trend that Airbnb has noticed is that nearly 60 percent of Airbnb for Work trips had more than one guest.

“We can offer big open areas for collaborations, while still giving employees their own private space,” said David Holyoke, global head of business travel at Airbnb. “We think this offers a more meaningful business trip and it saves the company a lot of money.”

Given the tremendous growth of the business segment, as well as the opportunity it represents, Airbnb is working on new features for business travelers. In fact, in the next week, Airbnb will be launching a new feature that lets employees search for Airbnb listings on a company-specific landing page.

So, for example, a Google employee might search for their lodging on Google.Airbnb.com, and the site would be refined to cater to Google’s preferences, including locations close to the office, budget, and other factors.

While the growth has picked up, Holyoke still sees Airbnb for Work as an opportunity to grow. He said that Airbnb for Work listings only represent 15 percent of all Airbnb trips.

But, the introduction of boutique hotels and other amenity-driven listings such as those on Airbnb Plus are paving the way for business travelers to lean toward Airbnb instead of a business hotel.

Plus, as mobility and relocation become even more important to how a business operates, Airbnb believes it can be a useful tool to help employees get started in a new town before they purchase a home.