These Digital Billboards From McDonald’s Change Depending on How Bad the Traffic Is

traffic-jam-mcdonalds-PAGE-2017.jpgGetting stuck in traffic at the end of the day sucks, which is why McDonald’s hopes some new creative ad targeting will get you to pull over at a nearby restaurant and pick up a hamburger on your way home.

The fast-food chain and Leo Burnett are running an intriguing out-of-home campaign in the U.K. that targets drivers on busy highways at peak times of the day. Digital billboards placed alongside the road feature a Big Mac when traffic is light, but once it starts to build, the creative switches to McDonald’s familiar golden arches with copy that reads, “Stuck in a jam? There’s a light at the end of the tunnel.”

“Simple, tantalizing, recognizable product shots stimulate the appetite during fast-flowing traffic, while longer contextual copy lines run during heavy, slow-moving traffic, acknowledging the delays to deliver a relevant and powerful call to action,” said Dan Dawson, chief technology officer at Grand Visual, an out-of-home company that helped produce the campaign along with OpenLoop, which monitored real-time stats from Google Traffic API to determine which creative would be served to which billboard.

Google BikeAround: Street View For Alzheimers

Meet Anne-Christine Hertz, a Swedish inventor who works at Health Technology Centre of Halland. Today, she shares a story of how the Centre used Google Street View to invent a device that helps the elderly with Alzheimer’s.

Every three seconds someone develops dementia, a condition that creates disability and dependency among many elderly people around the world, robbing the memory and judgment of some 40 million people. It’s not only overwhelming and stressful for those suffering, but also their loved ones trying to take care of them.

BikeAround is a new way to actively assist people with dementia, and pairs a stationary bike with Google Street View, that is then projected on a big screen to take patients on a virtual ride down memory lane, letting them pedal around a place they have visited in the past. Find out more here.

Are you ready for a $1,200 iPhone?

https-blueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.comuploadscardimage582986ff9b5935-fb79-4c94-9c30-f447605fcdf6Apple is finally slated to reveal the highly-anticipated deluxe anniversary iPhone on Sept. 12, and you will want to buy it immediately — but the sticker price could wind up dampening your excitement for the phone’s next-gen features.

 

Leaker Benjamin Geskin tweeted out a pricing tier for the new iPhones, citing information from a friend who has a friend at Apple.

New York Times report also backed the idea of a starting price “around $999,” for the iPhone, citing anonymous sources who had been briefed on the device. That’s a much more reliable report than just the whispers of friend of a friend — but others aren’t so convinced that Apple will ask such a high price for a phone.

UBS analysts Steven Milunovich and Benjamim Wilson wrote in an investors note that they “questioned the logic” of Apple putting such a premium on an iPhone. They claim instead that the company will roll out the deluxe device at a $900 starting point for a 64GB model, with a 256GB version eclipsing the $1,000 mark.

The analysts also noted that Apple typically takes some cues from its competitors, and with Samsung’s latest offerings starting well under $1,000 — the new Galaxy Note 8 starts at $930 unlocked — there’s little incentive for Apple to set the bar any higher.

None of these projections questioned the features expected in the deluxe iPhone, which include a new edge-to-edge OLED display, a nearly bezel-free screen with no home button, and a new sensor system for facial recognition.

Speculation over the price of the iPhone is nothing new for the rumor cycle, with reports flying about the extra costs for as long as there have been rumors about a new OLED screen. Now that we’re a week away from the big reveal, however, those projected costs are all the more pressing, since we’re finally closer to getting a shot to put down the cash for one of our own.

Facebook and Apple Are About to Take AR Mainstream. Here’s How Marketers Are Gearing Up

ar-kit-furniture-CONTENT-2017-840x445This past weekend in New York, the United Nations created a Facebook Live filter for World Humanitarian Day that let users overlay their real-time clips with augmented reality, particularly scrolling copy that told stories about civilians who have been affected by conflict. In Times Square, AR-enhanced videos aired on one of the iconic, commercial intersection’s large billboards. The endeavor was powered by Facebook’s 4-month-old AR system, dubbed Camera Effects Studio, which is getting the attention of brand marketers.

“For us, Facebook is an amazing platform to develop AR on because people are inherently using it already,” said Craig Elimeliah, managing director of creative technology at VML, the UN’s agency. “It includes Instagram as well. It includes Live and regular camera—so the sheer scale is unbelievable.”

While AR is still exploratory territory for marketers and media companies, its pixelated push to the mainstream has gotten a series of boosts this year from some of the biggest digital players. Snapchat—with its wacky filters and other virtual overlays—has continued to be popular among teens (even if Wall Street doesn’t like its pace). Apple, which has long been seen as a potential AR game changer due to the popularity of its iPhone and iPad, seems primed to give AR the turbocharge it needs to attract older demographics. When the Cupertino, Calif.-based company releases its iOS 11 mobile operating system in September, hundreds of millions of Apple-device owners will have augmented reality at their fingertips with a set of features called ARKit.

“Apple and Facebook will make augmented reality an everyday reality,” said David Deal, a digital marketing consultant. “We’ll see plenty of hit and miss with AR as we did when Apple opened up the iPhone to app developers, but ultimately both Apple and Facebook are in the best position to steamroll Snapchat with AR.”

Ikea, which will be one of the first major brands on Apple’s AR platform at launch, is developing an app that allows customers to see what furniture and other household items would look like in a three-dimensional view inside their homes. Ikea also plans to introduce new products in the AR app before they hit store shelves.

Read the full article here. 

Over a Third of Millennials in Relationships Spy on Partners’ Digital Correspondence

Well this is something to think about…

A sizable number of millennial couples suffer from a breach of digital privacy. But instead of an anonymous hacker, the source of such transgressions comes from closer to home—each other.

More than one-third of millennials in relationships read their partner’s texts and emails weekly without permission, according to a new study by pollster YouGov. This sneaky behavior raises the real question of whether millennials’ relationships are built on a solid foundation of trust.

US Internet Users Who Have Read a Significant Other's Text Messages, Social Media or Emails, by Age, July 2017 (% of respondents in each group)

Among millennials, the urge to take a surreptitious peek at a partner’s communications appears too great an urge to resist. While about one-quarter (23%) of all US adults surveyed admitted to reading a significant other’s texts, that figure was 37% among 18- to 34-year-olds.

Similarly, 37% of millennials looked at a partner’s social media accounts, while just 23% of total adults did the same. A higher number of millennials (31%) perused their romantic interest’s emails, compared with 22% of overall adults.

Unsurprisingly, those ages 55 and older looked at their partner’s digital correspondence at much lower levels than other age groups.

Millennials were also more predisposed to breaking up over text. YouGov found that 33% of millennials had ended a relationship via SMS, compared with 11% of those ages 35 to 54. Only 1% of those 55 or older admitted to a digital Dear John letter.

Digital privacy in millennial relationships—or the lack thereof—highlights how important online communications have become for people in the demographic.

A separate study conducted in June by home security firm Safe Home found fewer millennials (15%) said they would not use a device due to a privacy threat than any other age group.

US Internet Users Who Would Not Use a Device due to a Privacy Threat, by Age, March 2017 (% of respondents in each group)

By contrast, more than twice as many respondents ages 65 and older (38%) would decline to use a device that might threaten their privacy.

“Millennials have less expectation of digital privacy than their elders—and, perhaps because of that, seem to care less about it,” said eMarketer Senior Analyst Mark Dolliver.

He added, “It’s only a matter of time before there’s an app that leaves telltale lipstick on one’s collar, so it shouldn’t surprise us if millennials are rummaging through one another’s would-be private communications in the meantime.”