7 tech trends that will rule CES 2018

https-blueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.comuploadscardimage686438bf923d01-2535-46f1-8bb9-2dd8e6a027dcWith the new year comes new tech, and it’s not a gradual process. The world’s biggest tech show, CES, kicks off before the first week of 2018 is over, with the first official product unveilings on Sunday, Jan. 7. So what will CES 2018 have in store?

First off, brace yourself: CES is a massive blast of technology news, most of it junk. Even looking past the vaporware and fly-by-night companies looking to make a quick buck on last year’s trends, CES is where every niche consumer technology comes to have its 15 minutes for the year. A lot of it is important, but only to a few.

CES is also where you’ll see the leaders in virtually every major tech category out in force, and they come to make news. Some industries, like automotives, are attracted to CES because it lets them break out from their own routines and declare themselves tech companies. Traditional players, like TV manufacturers, have a harder time standing out, but when they do, they can take hold of the conversation for the year. And for emerging technologies like 5G or augmented reality, there’s simply no bigger platform.

So what does all this mean for CES 2018? Here’s a road map of the biggest tech trends you can expect to make headlines at the show: READ FULL ARTICLE HERE. 

These Digital Billboards From McDonald’s Change Depending on How Bad the Traffic Is

traffic-jam-mcdonalds-PAGE-2017.jpgGetting stuck in traffic at the end of the day sucks, which is why McDonald’s hopes some new creative ad targeting will get you to pull over at a nearby restaurant and pick up a hamburger on your way home.

The fast-food chain and Leo Burnett are running an intriguing out-of-home campaign in the U.K. that targets drivers on busy highways at peak times of the day. Digital billboards placed alongside the road feature a Big Mac when traffic is light, but once it starts to build, the creative switches to McDonald’s familiar golden arches with copy that reads, “Stuck in a jam? There’s a light at the end of the tunnel.”

“Simple, tantalizing, recognizable product shots stimulate the appetite during fast-flowing traffic, while longer contextual copy lines run during heavy, slow-moving traffic, acknowledging the delays to deliver a relevant and powerful call to action,” said Dan Dawson, chief technology officer at Grand Visual, an out-of-home company that helped produce the campaign along with OpenLoop, which monitored real-time stats from Google Traffic API to determine which creative would be served to which billboard.

Google BikeAround: Street View For Alzheimers

Meet Anne-Christine Hertz, a Swedish inventor who works at Health Technology Centre of Halland. Today, she shares a story of how the Centre used Google Street View to invent a device that helps the elderly with Alzheimer’s.

Every three seconds someone develops dementia, a condition that creates disability and dependency among many elderly people around the world, robbing the memory and judgment of some 40 million people. It’s not only overwhelming and stressful for those suffering, but also their loved ones trying to take care of them.

BikeAround is a new way to actively assist people with dementia, and pairs a stationary bike with Google Street View, that is then projected on a big screen to take patients on a virtual ride down memory lane, letting them pedal around a place they have visited in the past. Find out more here.

Are you ready for a $1,200 iPhone?

https-blueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.comuploadscardimage582986ff9b5935-fb79-4c94-9c30-f447605fcdf6Apple is finally slated to reveal the highly-anticipated deluxe anniversary iPhone on Sept. 12, and you will want to buy it immediately — but the sticker price could wind up dampening your excitement for the phone’s next-gen features.

 

Leaker Benjamin Geskin tweeted out a pricing tier for the new iPhones, citing information from a friend who has a friend at Apple.

New York Times report also backed the idea of a starting price “around $999,” for the iPhone, citing anonymous sources who had been briefed on the device. That’s a much more reliable report than just the whispers of friend of a friend — but others aren’t so convinced that Apple will ask such a high price for a phone.

UBS analysts Steven Milunovich and Benjamim Wilson wrote in an investors note that they “questioned the logic” of Apple putting such a premium on an iPhone. They claim instead that the company will roll out the deluxe device at a $900 starting point for a 64GB model, with a 256GB version eclipsing the $1,000 mark.

The analysts also noted that Apple typically takes some cues from its competitors, and with Samsung’s latest offerings starting well under $1,000 — the new Galaxy Note 8 starts at $930 unlocked — there’s little incentive for Apple to set the bar any higher.

None of these projections questioned the features expected in the deluxe iPhone, which include a new edge-to-edge OLED display, a nearly bezel-free screen with no home button, and a new sensor system for facial recognition.

Speculation over the price of the iPhone is nothing new for the rumor cycle, with reports flying about the extra costs for as long as there have been rumors about a new OLED screen. Now that we’re a week away from the big reveal, however, those projected costs are all the more pressing, since we’re finally closer to getting a shot to put down the cash for one of our own.