Digital advertising in the US is finally bigger than print and television

Screen_Shot_2019_02_19_at_9.18.07_PMIt was inevitable, but it’s finally here: Digital advertising businesses like Facebook and Google will be bigger in the US this year than traditional advertising businesses like TV, radio, and newspapers.

New estimates from eMarketer show that US advertisers will spend more than $129 billion on digital advertising in 2019 — more than the $109 billion they plan to spend on “traditional” advertising.

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Super Bowl Viewership Falls To Lowest Since 2008 In Historically Low Scoring Game – Update

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The CBS broadcast game out of Atlanta was seen by a total audience of 100.7 million, according to CBS Sports.

That number comes from when you add up everyone who watched on CBS the network, CBS Interactive, NFL digital properties, Verizon Media mobile properties, ESPN Deportes television and other digital properties. Besides being a very unique bundling spin on Super Bowl numbers that previous broadcasters haven’t shamelessly taken, that’s the first time the NFL’s big game on a network as fallen beneath 100 million viewers since 2009 when the Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Arizona Cardinals 27-23 in Super Bowl XLIII.

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SUPER BOWL AD REVIEW: YARD BY YARD AND YAWN BY YAWN

Screen Shot 2019-02-04 at 8.51.49 AM.pngIf you’re the kind of person who looks for patterns, you have a lot to work with in this batch of Super Bowl spots. Despite each 30-second commercial costing upwards of $5 million, on par with recent years, there was a lot of mediocrity. There’s also lots of jokes about robots. They’re in beer ads, potato chip ads, home security ads and, well, Alexa ads. It’s almost as if we’re afraid of something. Then there are the women: Advertisers appear to have glommed on to the fact that half the Big Game audience is female. Imagine that! Enter Serena Williams for Bumble and Sarah Michelle Gellar for Olay. Brands steered clear of any controversial issues or potential political hot potatoes. Which is for the best: Why fumble when you can blitz with gags? Well, we’ll get to that. Anyway, we heard there was a game on, too.

See all the reviews here.

Linear TV ad spend plunges while digital broadcast surges

reportt-20180730071844179.jpgThe U.S. endured a .35 percent year-over-year contraction across broadcast, digital broadcast and radio platforms in Q2, according to a new report.

This figure comes despite the emergence of political advertising spend in primary Democrat and Republican elections, which has seen a 264 percent growth rate. When excluding political ad spend from the findings, broadcast, digital broadcast and radio saw an overall 4.90 percent contraction compared to this time last year.

The findings, from Matrix Solutions’ 2018 Midyear Ad Spend Report, are the latest comprehensive update on the state of the advertising spend ecosystem. It derived from the activity of more than 10,000 active users within media ad sales teams from January 2018 to June 2018.

“According to our data, overall ad spend throughout the year, to date, has remained relatively flat when including the buoyancy that always comes from political campaigns, and without there’s a clear contraction,” said Mark Gorman, CEO at Matrix Solutions.

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Next year, people will spend more time online than they will watching TV. That’s a first.

It’s finally happening: Next year, people around the world will spend more time online than they do watching TV, according to new data from measurement company Zenith.

In 2019, people are expected to spend an average of 170.6 minutes each day on online activities like watching videos on YouTube, sharing photos on Facebook and shopping on Amazon. They’ll spend slightly less time — 170.3 minutes —watching TV.

The global transition from TV to internet as the main entertainment medium was a long time coming, but it also happened faster than expected. Last year, Zenith predicted that TV would still be more popular in 2019 but has since revised its estimates.

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REPORT: People are ditching cable at a faster clip than previously thought

screen shot 2017-09-12 at 55636 pmTV ad spending will be lower than anticipated this year, according to eMarketer, because people are cord-cutting at a faster clip than previously expected.

According to the market-research company, TV ad spending in 2017 will expand just 0.5% to $71.65 billion, down from the $72.72 billion predicted in its first-quarter forecast for 2017. Further, it said, TV’s share of total media ad spending in the US will drop to 34.9% and is expected to fall below 30% by 2021.

“eMarketer expected a slowdown this year in TV ad sales, after 2016 benefited from both the Olympics and US presidential election,” said Monica Peart, eMarketer’s senior forecasting director. “However, traditional TV advertising is slowing even more than expected, as viewers switch their time and attention to the growing list of live streaming and over-the-top [OTT] platforms.”

Cord-cutters, or consumers who are opting for getting their TV via the internet rather than traditional pay TV services, are a major factor behind tempered TV ad spending. As the phenomenon gains momentum, traditional pay TV operators like Dish Network are developing their own streaming platforms such as Sling TV, networks such as HBO and ESPN are launching or planning their own standalone digital subscription services, and digital players like Hulu and YouTube are delivering live TV channels over the web at lower prices.

In fact, cord-cutting has become so prevalent that even telecommunication companies like AT&T and T-Mobile have jumped in on the action in recent weeks, offering customers bundle deals with access to streaming services like Netflix and HBO.

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eMarketer has also increased its estimates for the growth in cord-cutters substantially for 2017 through 2021, saying that by 2021 the number of cord-cutters will nearly equal the number of people who have never had traditional pay TV, or “cord-nevers.”

The company forecasts that there will be 22.2 million cord-cutters over the age of 18 this year, more than the 15.4 million the company had previously predicted. This figure is up 33.2% over 2016. The number of US adult cord-nevers is expected to grow 5.8% this year to 34.4 million.

“Younger audiences continue to switch to either exclusively watching OTT video or watching them in combination with free TV options,” said Chris Bendtsen, the senior forecasting analyst at eMarketer. “Last year, even the Olympics and presidential elections could not prevent younger audiences from abandoning pay TV.”

While eMarketer predicts that 196.3 million US adults will still watch traditional pay TV, including cable, satellite, or telco, this year, that number would be down 2.4% from 2016. By 2021, the company thinks, that total will have fallen nearly 10% compared with 2016.

US adults who watch TV are spending less time in front of the screen as well. The average time spent watching TV among US adults this year will drop 3.1% to three hours, 58 minutes a day this year, according to eMarketer, the first time it has dropped below four hours.

In contrast, digital video consumption continues to rise. US adults will consume one hour, 17 minutes of digital video this year, the company said, up 9.3% over 2016.