Google Separates YouTube from Google+, Refocuses Social Network

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA - JANUARY 30:  A sign is posted on the exterior of Google headquarters on January 30, 2014 in Mountain View, California. Google reported a 17 percent rise in fourth quarter earnings with profits of $3.38 billion, or $9.90 a share compared to $2.9 billion, or $8.62 per share one year ago.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA – JANUARY 30: A sign is posted on the exterior of Google headquarters on January 30, 2014 in Mountain View, California. Google reported a 17 percent rise in fourth quarter earnings with profits of $3.38 billion, or $9.90 a share compared to $2.9 billion, or $8.62 per share one year ago. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Google took a first step toward a major shift in its social strategy Monday by separating YouTubefrom Google+. The changes were announced on both the official YouTube and Google+ blogs, with the latter putting it this way:

“In the coming months, a Google Account will be all you’ll need to share content, communicate with contacts, create a YouTube channel and more, all across Google. YouTube will be one of the first products to make this change.”

Google directly tied YouTube to Google+ in September 2013, at the time requiring users to activate Google+ for their Google account and using their Google+ real names in comments. Starting a new channel also required a Google+ profile.

These requirements were meant to improve comment quality on YouTube, and promote Google+ itself, but were met by resistance by many of the site’s users. YouTube announced Monday that it will de-couple the two services in the coming months, while at the same time adding further tweaks to improve comments on YouTube.

Read full article here. 

Is Google+ Finally Cooked for Good?

google-plus-cooked-hed-2015_0Google yesterday admitted it was wrong to require Google+ account holders to use the company’s other digital products, marking a significant policy departure for its struggling social media hub that was hailed as a “Facebook killer” in 2011. The Mountain View, Calif.-based player will not force products onto Google+ users and will move some features into other Google services.

The development calls into question whether Google+ is on its last legs, particularly with marketers. So, when we asked a few agency execs to weigh in, we expected eulogies of sorts, more than anything. But instead, we got answers that were quite nuanced.

“Google+ as we know it is dead, but there will be pieces of it, once spun off, that we will use in the future,” predicted Matt Rednor, CEO at Decoded Advertising. “Hangouts, for example, is a much better video-communication platform than [the iPhone’s] FaceTime and could be a successful tool with much greater reach if rolled out as a separate product.”

Read full article here. 

5 Words to Describe Ineffective Mobile Marketers via Adweek

ineffective-mobile-marketers-hed-2015Google’s Jason Spero refers to consumer actions on mobile devices as signals, rich with information that tells marketers a great deal—if they are on the lookout for them.”I have more marketers that I’m convincing to be curious about those signals than marketers who are overusing those signals to the point of abuse [like invading privacy],” Spero, Google vp of performance media, told me in an exclusive interview for my new book,The Art of Mobile Persuasion.

“My problem isn’t that marketers are afraid to use those signals because they over-respect them or think the consumers don’t want it. My bigger problem is marketers that still don’t know how to action the most basic capabilities in mobile. We have all the signals we need to deliver a great UX [user experience]. But we’ve got a heck of a lot of work to do to get there.”

In other words, short-sighted marketers are being inattentive when it comes to mobile.

There are four additional words to slap on ineffective mobile marketers. Read full article here.

Johnnie Walker Targets Newbie Whisky Drinkers With Technology

 From loopy virtual-reality experiments to prankvertising stunts, bars are the new hotspot for marketers to run tech-based initiatives.

Now, Johnnie Walker and agency Iris Singapore have built an interactive website and tablet app that doubles as in-bar entertainment. It’s part of the whisky brand’s “luxury mentoring” program that educates millennial consumers about the brand at high-end bars and tasting events. Read full article here.