REPORT: People are ditching cable at a faster clip than previously thought

screen shot 2017-09-12 at 55636 pmTV ad spending will be lower than anticipated this year, according to eMarketer, because people are cord-cutting at a faster clip than previously expected.

According to the market-research company, TV ad spending in 2017 will expand just 0.5% to $71.65 billion, down from the $72.72 billion predicted in its first-quarter forecast for 2017. Further, it said, TV’s share of total media ad spending in the US will drop to 34.9% and is expected to fall below 30% by 2021.

“eMarketer expected a slowdown this year in TV ad sales, after 2016 benefited from both the Olympics and US presidential election,” said Monica Peart, eMarketer’s senior forecasting director. “However, traditional TV advertising is slowing even more than expected, as viewers switch their time and attention to the growing list of live streaming and over-the-top [OTT] platforms.”

Cord-cutters, or consumers who are opting for getting their TV via the internet rather than traditional pay TV services, are a major factor behind tempered TV ad spending. As the phenomenon gains momentum, traditional pay TV operators like Dish Network are developing their own streaming platforms such as Sling TV, networks such as HBO and ESPN are launching or planning their own standalone digital subscription services, and digital players like Hulu and YouTube are delivering live TV channels over the web at lower prices.

In fact, cord-cutting has become so prevalent that even telecommunication companies like AT&T and T-Mobile have jumped in on the action in recent weeks, offering customers bundle deals with access to streaming services like Netflix and HBO.

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eMarketer has also increased its estimates for the growth in cord-cutters substantially for 2017 through 2021, saying that by 2021 the number of cord-cutters will nearly equal the number of people who have never had traditional pay TV, or “cord-nevers.”

The company forecasts that there will be 22.2 million cord-cutters over the age of 18 this year, more than the 15.4 million the company had previously predicted. This figure is up 33.2% over 2016. The number of US adult cord-nevers is expected to grow 5.8% this year to 34.4 million.

“Younger audiences continue to switch to either exclusively watching OTT video or watching them in combination with free TV options,” said Chris Bendtsen, the senior forecasting analyst at eMarketer. “Last year, even the Olympics and presidential elections could not prevent younger audiences from abandoning pay TV.”

While eMarketer predicts that 196.3 million US adults will still watch traditional pay TV, including cable, satellite, or telco, this year, that number would be down 2.4% from 2016. By 2021, the company thinks, that total will have fallen nearly 10% compared with 2016.

US adults who watch TV are spending less time in front of the screen as well. The average time spent watching TV among US adults this year will drop 3.1% to three hours, 58 minutes a day this year, according to eMarketer, the first time it has dropped below four hours.

In contrast, digital video consumption continues to rise. US adults will consume one hour, 17 minutes of digital video this year, the company said, up 9.3% over 2016.

10 Instagram Statistics to Keep in Mind When Planning Your 2018 Strategy

stories search1(2)Digital marketing changes very rapidly, so it’s important to stay caught up with new platforms, strategies and tactics.

One thing that can be extremely helpful when trying to stay ahead of the game is keeping an eye on stats – while you always need to be careful and consider the source of said statistics, they can help you predict trends and isolate opportunities in the market to make an impact.

The following Instagram stats could prove extremely valuable when planning your Instagram strategy for 2018. Check them out.

1. 70% of Hashtags on Instagram Are Branded

Brand engagement is notoriously higher on Instagram than other social channels. Brands have accepted this and decided to deploy their own hashtags to help organize the conversation.

Keep this in mind when planning campaigns in 2018 – having a campaign-specific hashtag can be very useful when tracking performance.

Get the rest of the stats here.

Do Different Age Groups Prefer Different Content Online? [Infographic]

There have been many reports on the different media consumption habits of each generation, and how you need to take that into account when planning on how you’re going to reach your audience, but there’s fewer on how, exactly, each generation is different.

One of the most difficult elements of this is that the Milennial generation, the one that every brand’s so keen to reach, is huge. Millennials (those born between 1981 and 2004) are now the largest generation in America, covering a wide spectrum of varying people – too wide, by most accounts, to actually be used as a demographic divider.

In practical terms, it makes more sense to separate this group into Gen Y (1981-1999) and Gen Z (After 2000), which is more likely to be indicative of habitual behavior – which is what Hand Made Writings have done with this new infographic, examining the key content habits and behaviors of the different generations online, based on various research reports and studies.

And while there are still some wide generalizations implied by the data – and the only true way to know your audience habits and preferences is to study your own audience analytics – the insights presented do provide some important considerations worthy of factoring into your plans and testing.

generational content info

Do Different Age Groups Prefer Different Content Online? [Infographic]

There have been many reports on the different media consumption habits of each generation, and how you need to take that into account when planning on how you’re going to reach your audience, but there’s fewer on how, exactly, each generation is different.

One of the most difficult elements of this is that the Milennial generation, the one that every brand’s so keen to reach, is huge. Millennials (those born between 1981 and 2004) are now the largest generation in America, covering a wide spectrum of varying people – too wide, by most accounts, to actually be used as a demographic divider.

In practical terms, it makes more sense to separate this group into Gen Y (1981-1999) and Gen Z (After 2000), which is more likely to be indicative of habitual behavior – which is what Hand Made Writings have done with this new infographic, examining the key content habits and behaviors of the different generations online, based on various research reports and studies.

And while there are still some wide generalizations implied by the data – and the only true way to know your audience habits and preferences is to study your own audience analytics – the insights presented do provide some important considerations worthy of factoring into your plans and testing.

generational content info

The Best Times to Post on Social Media (According to 20 Studies) [Infographic]

There’s always an inherent risk to ‘best times to post’ reports – with the most critical being that generic best times don’t relate to your specific audience and their habits. The only true way to know what times are best for you to post is to study your own analytics, test different post times, then study again, till you find what works.

But that said, there is still value in using generic best times as a guide, particularly as a means to narrow your test pool. This is particularly relevant when starting out – if you start with the generic best times, you may be closer to finding your optimum posting time in the beginning, which can help deliver better results faster, while you’re testing.

The team at CoSchedule also recognize that finding the mythical ‘best’ time for all can be challenging – so rather than coming up with a single survey report, they’ve actually collated the results of 20 ‘best times’ guides in order to formulate a more comprehensive, inclusive report on best posting times.

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8 Digital Stats From Last Week That Brand Marketers Need to Know

ice-cream-stats-CONTENT-2017-840x460We are now well into August and staring the busy fall sales season right in the eye, so digital marketers need to catch up on current trends. With that in mind, here are 8 stats from last week that grabbed our attention.

1. AI drives sales
Artificial intelligence represents a chance for startups to make an impact and cash in like never before. It’s especially interesting to see sister duo Caroline Stern Klatt and Dana Stern Gibber, who co-founded Headliner Labs, a two-year-old chatbots company that has landed clients like Women’s Wear Daily, BoxyCharm, La Sun, Jemma Wynne and Donni Charm. Donni Charm just reported that they saw a 63 percent increase in sales from their Headliner-powered chatbot, which helps consumers discover new products, deals and style guides.

“Across the board, Headliner’s clients are seeing a 40 percent engagement rate, with customers spending an average of six minutes per bot session,” Klatt claimed. “Most importantly, the bots are driving sales—we’ve seen an average of 13 percent increase in digital sales (across clients).”

See the rest of the stats here. 

Over 93% of Celebrity Influencers are Violating FTC Guidelines [Infographic]

As influencers and celebrities post, filter, and hashtag their way to fame and fortune, brands are working with them to reach and communicate with consumers. Influencer marketing on Instagram alone is now a massive $1 billion industry.

In April 2017, the FTC sent notices to over 90 celebrities, brands, and influencers reminding them of the regulations. Celebrities and influencers on Instagram have been known to neglect proper disclosures on paid posts, and we wanted to know the extent of the problem. Over the course of one month, we assessed the top 50 celebrities on Instagram to find that just 7% may be in compliance with the FTC’s guidelines and regulations.

Like the rest of the advertising industry, celebrity social media endorsements and influencer marketing are monitored by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the government agency charged with consumer protection against unfair or deceptive business practices. Previously, the FTC had filed several notable complaints against large companies like Lord & Taylor for failure to require disclosures on sponsored content on social media.

See the full breakdown of the state of FTC compliance among Instagram’s top 50 celebrities below.

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